Man Transforms His Unusual-Looking Bike Into A Staggering New Creation

True craftsmen can look at a twisted old piece of rusted metal and envision a sleek polished piece of furniture. However, it takes serious dedication and skill to actually transform that misshapen mess into the object they envisioned.

One man who owned a quadricycle frame wanted to do something extraordinary with it. He had a vision that at first seemed far-fetched, but after he went to work and it started finally coming together, the results truly were magical…

This was the frame of the quadricycle the builder used. This bare-bones setup was about as far away from luxurious as you can really get. However, the owner planned to totally transform it into something else entirely.

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A small amount of cardboard was just the start. It worked as a nifty little frame that he could use to design the main part of his new project. Clearly, he was making something that was going to look like a car.

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Piping was used to start the construction of the frame. Overall, the frame of the car was coming into shape around the quadricycle, but there was a long way to go before it really looked anything like an automobile.

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Here’s where it began to really take shape. More of the frame was wrapped around the cardboard, and it finally began to really resemble an actual car. By this point, you could barely make out the quadricycle that started this whole project

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The PVC pipes were kept together with packing tape. That was all this guy needed to tie a massive part of his quadricycle car together. Also, he put a back window into the car’s frame, which really helped show what he was going for.

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Here, you can actually see what the final product is supposed to resemble: a Porsche! The question still remained if could he really make a bike look anything like a real Porsche. Was this whole thing doomed?

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The body was covered in more tape, and a spoiler was added to make things look as authentic as possible. There was still a great deal of work to be done, but you can obviously see the general shape is virtually identical to the real deal.

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Real brake lights were installed. This was not going to just be some sort of fancy, enormous model. It was going to be pretty darn close to the real thing. That meant installing all sorts of different elements.

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Headlights were the next item on the list. Without headlights, he never would have been able to take this on the road at night, which was something he hoped to do. But he still needed a few more big touches before he could finally rest a little.

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The trunk really worked. He could store some luggage in there! What is even cooler about it, though, is how similar to a real car it is. A bonus to all of this is that it’s much more green than your average Porsche!

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There isn’t any engine, however. This baby is people-powered. You have to be glad that there are two sets of pedals for this thing, though. Having that extra power probably makes it a lot easier to move around.

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Next, he used foil to cover the body. The body was clearly still in need of some serious finishing touches, and if he was going to do this, he needed to go ahead and do it right. The way he did that was with this shiny foil!

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The only power this Porsche bike needed came from good old fashion hard work! Nothing like going out for a drive and getting a workout in the process! People probably think it’s real, and then they get closer and are completely stunned!

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Have you ever seen a Porsche made of cardboard and PVC? This is seriously a one-of-a-kind creation. Something like this is so rare to find, so it’s definitely a commendable achievement. Wonder how fast they can drive it?

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You can barely tell the difference. If you were walking down the street, you would probably be forced to stop in your tracks when this came peddling by. It also would not make any noise, unlike a real sports car.

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This Porsche bike is ready for its car show debut!  Truly, it’s a beautiful and spot-on creation. Unless you knew the owner, you’d have no idea there was actually a bicycle frame underneath all of that tin foil, cardboard, and plastic piping!

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Maybe his car doesn’t have the speed or the maneuverability of a Porsche, but it’s unlike anything someone with basic piping and cardboard ever built before! Still, this DIYer wasn’t alone in his ability to visualize.

After watching The Cannonball Run for the first time, Ken Imhoff, for instance, was a changed man. He was enchanted by the film’s Lamborghini Countach, and he visualized himself sitting behind the wheel.

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Though Ken was raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he was born in Oxford, England. Once his father completed his service in the Air Force, the family moved back to the United States.

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Since his childhood, Ken always loved cars, as this picture from 1958 shows. Here he is behind the wheel of a sports car chassis that his father made by hand. This fascination with motor vehicles never went away.

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Ken knew that the Lamborghini Countach was something special the moment that he first laid eyes on it — kind of like a Porsche made out of a bike.

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Nearly a decade after he first saw this Lamborghini, Ken got to work. Some people would have simply bought the car if they could afford it, but that didn’t interest Ken. He started from scratch with what would become a 17-year process in his basement.

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Ken had been working with metal for many years, so he definitely knew what he was doing when it came to engineering and welding the vehicle. Yet it took a lot of determination to succeed in his journey—technical skills alone wouldn’t have been enough!

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While Ken’s home did have a garage, he decided to work in the basement instead to protect his project from the elements during harsh winters. It also meant that he wouldn’t have to heat the garage, saving him some money.

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The project officially began in September of 1990, and it wouldn’t be completed until nearly two decades and several thousands of dollars later. His first step was to use a 1:16 scale model to build a wooden frame, helping him measure the body panels’ shapes.

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Each one of these panels were formed from aluminum by hand with a forming tool. This step alone took nearly a year. He covered the entire frame in panels, but saved more difficult parts like the doors for last.

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Even with Ken’s experience, there was a steep learning curve. He made plenty of mistakes along the way, such as warping the panels.

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Ken built a frame from five-and-a-half inch blocks to hold the chassis together, maintain ground clearance, and keep the ride height consistent.

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He securely built the body and upper frame on this support with the chassis. Everything had to be perfectly aligned, which Ken said was particularly difficult.

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It all worked out, though, because the aluminum body and chassis are both gorgeous. Ken expressed his pride in every detail, from the mufflers to the radiators, on his website.

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Five layers of bodywork were required, though, for the thorough preparation necessary before painting the vehicle. He began with self-etching primer, then used an epoxy primer to seal it. Yet another layer of epoxy primer was needed after Ken completed his custom body work, then he finished it all with high-build primer.

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By this point, it definitely started looking like a Lamborghini, even before elements like wheels and outer panels were added. Ken next needed to add break lines, pedals, and a fuel cell.

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Ken needed a professional, off-site booth to paint the shell. In order to accomplish this, he had to individually transport each of the 33 pieces back and forth, one by one, which took 25 hours. As tedious as it was, it was nothing compared to how large-scale the rest of the project was.

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Ken gave the designs from his blueprints to his friend Dale, a machinist. It took Dale 10 hours to turn the two-inch-thick metal sheet into what we see below in its completed form.

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That winter, Ken tweaked his project in a number of ways. He made reinforcements for the rear carriers and fixed a number of other issues like the leaking coolant. He couldn’t wait to take the car for a test drive, but there were plenty of tasks he had to tackle first, such as improving the engine and replacing the spark plugs.

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By 2008, the project was finally finished! There was just one problem: the car was still stuck in his basement! Ken needed an excavator to get the car on the road, which took 90 minutes—not to mention, plenty of patience and determination. Yet after 17 years of hard work, it was certainly worth the trouble.

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The Lambo now makes its home in Miami after being purchased by a new owner in September 2016—26 years after the project started. Perhaps, for Ken Imhoff, the process of building the car was more exciting than actually owning it. But for some people, the appeal is the garage itself, not the car.

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You see, Whitney Lee Morris’ family didn’t reside in any kind of sprawling mansion like you might find in other parts of the area. In fact, they didn’t even live in an ordinary house; they lived in a garage!

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Whitney’s family called a regular ol’ garage their home. Well, it wasn’t regular, exactly. What they did to the interior was something that would almost seem too good to be true if there wasn’t photographic evidence to back it up!

Whitney’s home was built in the 1920s as part of a much larger building, but she and her family only needed something small for their living situation. While it was only 362 square feet, it was more than enough…

Despite the fact that it seemed like a crazy idea, Whitney knew that she had a brilliant, cost-effective plan at her fingertips—and once she finally made her ambitious dream a reality, everyone took notice.

As a talented designer, Whitney used her artistic and economical eye to create enough room for not just herself, but her whole family. Complete with a bedroom, kitchen, and living area, this garage really was a dream home…

Whitney’s creation was a fully functional, fully realized, and breathtakingly beautiful home that anybody would be lucky to call their own! How she did it was impressive, too…

The house’s wide entrance and doors were replaced with spacious panels and a glass door that let in natural light, giving the whole space a warm, welcoming—and almost heavenly—atmosphere.

Whitney also situated a small, yet charming and perfectly functional, desk near the door to utilize as her professional workspace. It wasn’t big, but it got the job done—kind of like the entire home!

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The mirror hanging over the desk also helped to make the room seem significantly bigger than it actually was. No matter how large your own home is, this is a helpful trick that’s worth trying! There was more, too…

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A simple tablecloth draped over the coffee table helped to transform an ordinary living room into a pleasant and cozy dining room. Can’t you imagine sitting here for a nice gourmet meal or even just a casual lunch?

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The rear wall, which would ordinarily be used to hang garden tools and other outdoor supplies were it still a garage, now boasted beautiful stainless steel appliances, wooden cabinetry, and artwork.

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Whitney even added a beautiful L-shaped couch to section off the space from the entertaining area without making it seem too closed-off. It looked like it would be able to comfortably fit a few guests. Speaking of, where did this family sleep?

Whitney partitioned off the bedroom for more privacy. Obviously, it was gorgeously designed! Stanlee and Sophee took great care to watch over their teeny infant sibling who was enjoying a snooze in their brand-new digs.

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There was even a lovely little backyard! Whitney and Adam converted the small outdoor space into a modestly sized patio area, as well as added to the comfortable décor with fairy lights and trailing ivy.

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A tiny home like the one that Whitney and her family renovated proved that larger, more conventional living spaces were overrated, quite often unnecessary—and very likely overpriced!

You don’t need a lot of space or “stuff” in order to be happy, and this little family certainly demonstrated that! Whitney’s motto was that most people “don’t need to ‘live large’ to live beautifully,” and you don’t need a ton of experience, either.

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After discovering a camper on sale online, 14-year-old Ellie spent $200 she had saved up from chores and birthday money to make it hers. Her purchasing it wasn’t the impressive part, however, its what she transformed it into that is incredible.

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The camper had originally been used for camping and hunting, and it was in pretty rough shape. It was clear from the start that Ellie had her work cut out for her, but she didn’t hesitate for a second, she had a clear vision of her mini dream home.

Ellie got the idea for her own camper after her older brother Isaiah built a tiny cabin on their family’s property. She wanted her own hangout spot, but she wanted something “cuter” and closer to the house so she could have electricity and WiFi.

To spruce up the place and give it more of a feminine feel, she decided to paint over the pseudo-wood paneling on the inside of the camper with a peach and seafoam color scheme. She even added some polka dots for a special touch.

Ellie’s father Larry helped with the carpentry, and her grandmother even made curtains to hang inside. Aside from a little help here and there, Ellie really did all the work herself— from design to installation and painting, Ellie was doing it all!

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She wasn’t a huge fan of the funky green seventies floor that was all over the camper. It was also in pretty bad shape… To cover it up she picked out some affordable laminate wood flooring and even laid them down herself.

She collected items for the inside all summer, and she even made sure to construct a winding path to her new hideaway. All roads may lead to Rome, but all paths lead to Ellie’s home— in this backyard anyway.

Ellie is hoping to save up for a window A/C unit next summer. But what she has already done is beyond impressive. Just take another look at all the before pictures before you see Ellie’s finished camper.

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With school just around the corner, she also hopes to have a few friends over for a sleepover. How cool would it be to have your own private mini house for some serious girl talk and snacks?

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Ellie even painted the exterior of the trailer with unique designs around the edges that she came up with all on her own. It looks like her new little camper is ready for its big premiere!

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All in a summer’s work for Ellie! Not too shabby for a 14-year-old, right? Maybe we should have been spending my summer vacations being a little more productive back then!

When people imagine their dream home, most picture some sort of a mansion, but that wasn’t the case for Ellie, in fact, a Texas man had a very similar vision as the 14-year-old. Rather than buying a house, he wanted to build one, with a small budget and a lot of creativity.

Michael Talley, an illustrator and graphic designer from Austin, Texas, always dreamed of building his own home from pre-existing materials. So in 2016 he finally took the opportunity to let his creativity flow and get his hands dirty.

First, Talley purchased an old school bus for $2,200 off an auction website listed by the Austin Independent School District. It needed to be stripped entirely of its seats to make room for his new project, but having no experience with construction made this a difficult task…

Although Talley was never a big handyman, he is an expert in design. He draws comic books, event posters, signs, and even political cartoons. When he decided to embark on his school bus adventure, he must have felt inspired by his personal hero Davy Crockett, because he took the leap and never looked back.

Stripping the bus was the first critical step in the process of transforming this bus from a kid-mover to an actual home. Talley wasn’t entirely sure about what he was doing, but he got to work anyway, removing evidence of the bus’s previous life in the process.

Talley put his imagination to work and began to design his new space to the exact millimeter. He drew up a kitchen, bathroom, living/workspace, and a bedroom. He kept the bathroom and kitchen closest to the front so they could be easily accessed during an outdoor BBQ.

Talley made one big error when buying the bus, though. He didn’t realize how high the roof would be! Although it could easily fit school children, it was not tall enough to comfortably house the 6″6 giant. Talley had no choice but to literally raise the roof, which would be impossible to do by himself.

Luckily, he didn’t have to do it all alone. He had help from his stepdad, a few friends, and even some very kind strangers. After all, the project proved to be a much more difficult one than he had imagined.

The bus was almost entirely re-built. The roof was raised, the windows were removed, the back was expanded and even the insulation was renewed. The build was taking longer and costing more than he had planned…

You see, the bus was being sold by the school district for a reason: it was old and worn-out. If Talley wanted to drive it, the engine, power steering, and even the tires needed an update. “Changing a tire on this thing was more expensive and less fun than I had thought it would be,” he said.

After altering the entire “skeleton” of the bus, it was finally time to spruce up its insides. Talley got some good deals at IKEA and was able to decorate his living space within a fairly small budget.

The reason he picked this specific bus was because he used to ride an Armadillo bus, and it reminded him of his own school days. Nostalgia can be a powerful force, but who would have thought it would influence his new home? This motivation would come in handy pretty soon, as Talley was about to face some tough times…

Not only was the physical labor challenging, but Talley also experienced quite some hardship in his personal life. In the year that he spent building his dream house, he lost his job, his girlfriend, and his grandfather, but he was determined to keep going. After all, he had nothing left to lose.

Talley’s determination paid off when the interior came together. The first thing he finished was the kitchen. He chose white subway tiles with black grout and installed everything himself. He is not the biggest cook, but he does need a good place to snack and entertain.

After the kitchen came the bedroom. It is not only incredibly cozy and comfortable, but it has a spectacular view of wherever Talley drives it. The original windows of the backdoor are still there, so he often overlooks a field or a forest.

The living room is not too shabby either. Talley has set himself up with the foundations of his old couch, a brand new TV and of course, his Playstation. He has both a heater and an air conditioner in case he drives the bus through all kinds of climates.

As it turns out, the kids putting “kick me” notes on each other’s backs were not the only pranksters around. On April Fools’ Day, Talley posted a picture on Facebook of a school bus burning to the ground, causing his friends and family to almost have a heart attack. Luckily it was just a prank, and his dreams did not go up in flames.

With his school bus still intact, Talley now needed gas, water, and electricity. Although he installed a few tanks and generators, he wanted to leave only a small ecological footprint, so he installed a few solar panels on the roof (all by himself!)

Most of the power generated by the panels goes straight to his beloved TV. After a week of watching Netflix on his phone, he knew he needed a big screen in his living room and his bedroom. Now he can watch The Sandlot whenever the need should arise.

Although he loved the look of the classic school bus, Talley didn’t want to cause any confusion and decided to paint the exterior. He ended up choosing white because it keeps him cool in the Texas weather and leaves room to add more color later. Who knows, maybe he’ll add some flowers and peace symbols in the future…

At the end of a long day at work, Talley likes to climb up on his roof and enjoy the sights and a glass of wine. That victorious feeling certainly makes all the effort worth it, which is pretty obvious because the bus revamp trend has even gone international!

Susan Mosier and her husband Philip bought a vintage 1960s London double-decker bus. They paid £5,000 but spent over £100,000 transforming it into an unbelievable hotel suite, complete with plumbing, electric. and luxury decor.

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They first had to remove all the rust from the exterior of the bus, which required sanding away its iconic red paint and reapplying it once it was time. Downstairs is a beautiful bathroom with a freestanding tub, flatscreen TV, and dim lighting.

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The bus upstairs is a plush retreat that boasts a huge bed, a sofa, and a small dining area. All but a few of the bus’s seats were removed to make room for the decor while maintaining some of its original charms.

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The hotel suite is known as Trafalgar Square, and it resides near the couple’s hotel near Beamish, County Durham. This incredible couples’ suite is available to rent for £220 per night during on a weekday, or £250 on a Friday or Saturday.

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